A blog about a paper about a tweet chat about a paper…

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A couple of years ago I was deep in a policy class at UBC as part of my EdD. My final paper was about policies in LGBTQ healthcare – from global (like the WHO resources) to local (what my department didn’t have and why). Tracing the web of policies, legislation and guidelines around LGBTQ health was fascinating and depressing. Canada is one of the best countries in the world when it comes to anti-discrimination laws and every hospital has a statement about diversity. However, there are still lesbians who avoid screening appointments because of their past experiences with healthcare, trans patients who get treated terribly in the ER and gay men with cancer who can’t find local resources that include them and their loved ones.  Polices and legislation are great, but we also need healthcare professionals who understand what the issues are, know how to work with LGBTQ patients and work towards fixing some of the systematic gaps that some of our patients fall through.

I adapted the work I’d done in the policy class and the sought the insight and lived experience of UK radiographer Sean Ralph to co-author a paper that was a kind of “LGBTQ health issues 101 (and how you can help)” for Radiography. It was packed with references and we hoped it would be used by people wanting an overview of the issue. It was the first paper about LGBTQ issues in any of the three major radiography journals. In the meantime, our Twitter journal club (MedRadJClub) was getting going. The paper that Sean and I had written was suggested for one of the monthly chats. One of the regular chat participants was Sophia Thom, a student diagnostic radiographer from the UK. We’d met in real life at a conference (UKRCO) where I’d been talking about my EdD research – and we’d gone out with Sean to Canal Street in Manchester to drink gin and talk about research, coming out in healthcare and the perils of online dating. Sophia wanted to do some research but wasn’t sure where to start. I said something like “Oh, we’re doing a MedRadJClub chat later this year about our LGBTQ paper, why don’t we use the data from that and submit it to a conference – how about UKRCO next year?”

So we did. In this case we were interested in how much education the participants had received around LGBTQ people and healthcare, and what was going on in their departments. We had 44 people join the chat and a lot of conversation. We weren’t surprised that most people hadn’t had a lot of formal education – although participants shared an amazing list of self-found resources. We co-wrote the conference abstract in the fall with Julia Watson (a MedRadJClub friend) and Kim Meeking (Kim’s research area is social media) and submitted it to UKRCO with crossed fingers. When it was accepted we analysed the chat data and Google Drive’d the poster design together complete with Sophia’s rainbow Twitter symbol! As we’d done the analysis it seemed wasteful to stop there. There’s very little in print about this – and someone, somewhere might need citeable evidence. So we wrote the paper based on the tweet chat, based on the paper based on the policy class.

I think this process illustrates a few points. Firstly, if you want to get started use the resources you have, projects, essays, people and connections – the inspiration and material for writing a paper can come from many different sources. If you’re a new researcher, reach out to people who can help. Most of us are happy to give advice, edit, cheerlead or (sometimes) collaborate with you. Finally, if you’re an established researcher and have the skills, bring a few people along for the ride next time you do a project or write a paper. There’s a lot out there to investigate and we need more people to help!

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