Explosive Knowledge: Freddie Mercury and my Literature Review

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I am deep in my literature review. Having finished (for now) my results section I made an attempt to write the discussion. It was a sad effort. My results section is my stories, written very much from the heart and from being immersed in the transcripts from my participant interviews. I got very lost in the discussion section, trying to tie the stories back to the literature review I had done for my proposal, about ten million years ago. I kept writing little notes to myself like “add a section on how cancer care is gendered” and “stick in lots more about coming out”. Then I’d get sidetracked for days reading more about cancer and gender (that stuff is interesting!) and forget what I’d been doing.

My supervisor advised me to continue with the discussion – I had the stories in my head, she said, it’s the ideal time to put them in context, relate them back to your research questions. I do have the stories in my head. It’s reassuring. I read about patients being misidentified as sisters, not partners, and I think “oh, that happened to Lisa and Alex” – as if I know them instead of having invented them as characters in a story. It wasn’t enough though – there were big gaps to fill back at the literature review section.

The part I’m building at the moment is on coming out. I originally had a couple of pages in my proposal, which looked fine to me at the time, discussing the metaphor of the closet and how coming out isn’t a one-time act. That small section has grown to many, many pages. I might know more about coming out at this point than anyone in Edmonton (in theory anyway). Watching Bohemian Rhapsody last weekend, I found myself categorising Freddie Mercury’s identity management strategies in my head. He didn’t exactly hide it, most of the time, but used a combination of non-verbal disclosure such as covering and using clues to signal affiliation with a non-heterosexual identity. He was possibly one of the most queer rock stars in history, but some of his fans didn’t pick up the clues, the social context of a rock band served to mute the effectiveness of the message. Similar to Freddie, most LGB people use a combination of methods to come out, a process which is both continual and contextual. See how much fun I am to go to the movies with?

One thing that has struck me, as I wade through my papers, is how this is still very relevant. I did wonder, starting out, if being LGB was still (sometimes) something to be managed at work, or out in the world. In the last few days my news feed has popped up stories about two women being asked to leave a concert for kissing (in EDMONTON!) and a woman in Ontario being kicked out of her church for being in a same-sex relationship. Coming out, for them, had consequences. Watching TV, Drag Race is full of coming out stories, and Transparent is a study in coming out as trans*. At one-point Maura (the lead character, a transwoman) is told not to tell Grandma Rose because it would kill her. “Hey, that’s called ‘explosive knowledge’” I told my fascinated partner, “the idea that coming out could blow up a relationship** and/or cause physical or emotional violence!”

So, the take home message is mainly that I watch a lot of gay stuff, but also that I am mentally and physically immersed in my literature review. I think it was a good decision to do this before my discussion. I hope I will have both the theory and the emotional resonance of the stories available to me when I get there. I’m certainly seeing a lot of connections and hoping I won’t have to do a lot of backfilling if and when I come across an idea or theme I hadn’t  included. Knowledge, explosive or not, that will help me get to the end of this dissertation journey.

 

*I  know, I can’t believe it has taken this long for me to watch it!

** Orne, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

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