A blog about a paper about a tweet chat about a paper…

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A couple of years ago I was deep in a policy class at UBC as part of my EdD. My final paper was about policies in LGBTQ healthcare – from global (like the WHO resources) to local (what my department didn’t have and why). Tracing the web of policies, legislation and guidelines around LGBTQ health was fascinating and depressing. Canada is one of the best countries in the world when it comes to anti-discrimination laws and every hospital has a statement about diversity. However, there are still lesbians who avoid screening appointments because of their past experiences with healthcare, trans patients who get treated terribly in the ER and gay men with cancer who can’t find local resources that include them and their loved ones.  Polices and legislation are great, but we also need healthcare professionals who understand what the issues are, know how to work with LGBTQ patients and work towards fixing some of the systematic gaps that some of our patients fall through.

I adapted the work I’d done in the policy class and the sought the insight and lived experience of UK radiographer Sean Ralph to co-author a paper that was a kind of “LGBTQ health issues 101 (and how you can help)” for Radiography. It was packed with references and we hoped it would be used by people wanting an overview of the issue. It was the first paper about LGBTQ issues in any of the three major radiography journals. In the meantime, our Twitter journal club (MedRadJClub) was getting going. The paper that Sean and I had written was suggested for one of the monthly chats. One of the regular chat participants was Sophia Thom, a student diagnostic radiographer from the UK. We’d met in real life at a conference (UKRCO) where I’d been talking about my EdD research – and we’d gone out with Sean to Canal Street in Manchester to drink gin and talk about research, coming out in healthcare and the perils of online dating. Sophia wanted to do some research but wasn’t sure where to start. I said something like “Oh, we’re doing a MedRadJClub chat later this year about our LGBTQ paper, why don’t we use the data from that and submit it to a conference – how about UKRCO next year?”

So we did. In this case we were interested in how much education the participants had received around LGBTQ people and healthcare, and what was going on in their departments. We had 44 people join the chat and a lot of conversation. We weren’t surprised that most people hadn’t had a lot of formal education – although participants shared an amazing list of self-found resources. We co-wrote the conference abstract in the fall with Julia Watson (a MedRadJClub friend) and Kim Meeking (Kim’s research area is social media) and submitted it to UKRCO with crossed fingers. When it was accepted we analysed the chat data and Google Drive’d the poster design together complete with Sophia’s rainbow Twitter symbol! As we’d done the analysis it seemed wasteful to stop there. There’s very little in print about this – and someone, somewhere might need citeable evidence. So we wrote the paper based on the tweet chat, based on the paper based on the policy class.

I think this process illustrates a few points. Firstly, if you want to get started use the resources you have, projects, essays, people and connections – the inspiration and material for writing a paper can come from many different sources. If you’re a new researcher, reach out to people who can help. Most of us are happy to give advice, edit, cheerlead or (sometimes) collaborate with you. Finally, if you’re an established researcher and have the skills, bring a few people along for the ride next time you do a project or write a paper. There’s a lot out there to investigate and we need more people to help!

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Explosive Knowledge: Freddie Mercury and my Literature Review

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I am deep in my literature review. Having finished (for now) my results section I made an attempt to write the discussion. It was a sad effort. My results section is my stories, written very much from the heart and from being immersed in the transcripts from my participant interviews. I got very lost in the discussion section, trying to tie the stories back to the literature review I had done for my proposal, about ten million years ago. I kept writing little notes to myself like “add a section on how cancer care is gendered” and “stick in lots more about coming out”. Then I’d get sidetracked for days reading more about cancer and gender (that stuff is interesting!) and forget what I’d been doing.

My supervisor advised me to continue with the discussion – I had the stories in my head, she said, it’s the ideal time to put them in context, relate them back to your research questions. I do have the stories in my head. It’s reassuring. I read about patients being misidentified as sisters, not partners, and I think “oh, that happened to Lisa and Alex” – as if I know them instead of having invented them as characters in a story. It wasn’t enough though – there were big gaps to fill back at the literature review section.

The part I’m building at the moment is on coming out. I originally had a couple of pages in my proposal, which looked fine to me at the time, discussing the metaphor of the closet and how coming out isn’t a one-time act. That small section has grown to many, many pages. I might know more about coming out at this point than anyone in Edmonton (in theory anyway). Watching Bohemian Rhapsody last weekend, I found myself categorising Freddie Mercury’s identity management strategies in my head. He didn’t exactly hide it, most of the time, but used a combination of non-verbal disclosure such as covering and using clues to signal affiliation with a non-heterosexual identity. He was possibly one of the most queer rock stars in history, but some of his fans didn’t pick up the clues, the social context of a rock band served to mute the effectiveness of the message. Similar to Freddie, most LGB people use a combination of methods to come out, a process which is both continual and contextual. See how much fun I am to go to the movies with?

One thing that has struck me, as I wade through my papers, is how this is still very relevant. I did wonder, starting out, if being LGB was still (sometimes) something to be managed at work, or out in the world. In the last few days my news feed has popped up stories about two women being asked to leave a concert for kissing (in EDMONTON!) and a woman in Ontario being kicked out of her church for being in a same-sex relationship. Coming out, for them, had consequences. Watching TV, Drag Race is full of coming out stories, and Transparent is a study in coming out as trans*. At one-point Maura (the lead character, a transwoman) is told not to tell Grandma Rose because it would kill her. “Hey, that’s called ‘explosive knowledge’” I told my fascinated partner, “the idea that coming out could blow up a relationship** and/or cause physical or emotional violence!”

So, the take home message is mainly that I watch a lot of gay stuff, but also that I am mentally and physically immersed in my literature review. I think it was a good decision to do this before my discussion. I hope I will have both the theory and the emotional resonance of the stories available to me when I get there. I’m certainly seeing a lot of connections and hoping I won’t have to do a lot of backfilling if and when I come across an idea or theme I hadn’t  included. Knowledge, explosive or not, that will help me get to the end of this dissertation journey.

 

*I  know, I can’t believe it has taken this long for me to watch it!

** Orne, 2011